Why Opening a window might not be enough.

For the past two decades there has been mounting evidence that dependence on the natural exchange of air between the indoors and outdoors through air infiltration and exfiltration may not be satisfactory for good moisture control and indoor air quality. It also has become increasingly obvious that traditional ventilation methods, like opening a window or use of a common bath fan, are not providing adequate ventilation. A properly designed and installed ventilation system is the key to positive moisture control and will help ensure a healthy indoor environment for the occupant.We typically install either a heat-recovery ventilator (HRV) or an energy-recovery ventilator (ERV) in the homes we work on.

What are HRVs and ERVs
An HRV’s fans pull fresh air into a home while simultaneously exhausting stale air from the home. In most installations, the fresh air is delivered to the living room and bedrooms, while the stale air is removed from bathrooms, laundry rooms, and sometimes the kitchen.

Both the fresh air stream and the stale air stream flow through the HRV. The core of the appliance allows some of the heat from the warmer air stream (the stale air in winter, the fresh air in summer) to be transferred to the cooler air stream. In winter, in other words, the appliance “recovers” some of the heat that would have otherwise been exhausted. This heat transfer occurs without any mixing of the two air streams.

An ERV does everything that an HRV does. In addition, an ERV allows some of the moisture in the more humid air stream (usually the stale air in winter and the fresh air in summer) to be transferred to the air stream which is dryer. This transfer of moisture — called enthalpy transfer — occurs with very little mixing of the two air streams.

We believe that having fresh clean air for our families, and always recommend installing a quality ventilation system.  Our experts can guide you to a decision regarding what is best for your home.